Foreclosure crisis profiteers: Knowing the enemy

Our previous two posts dealt with the origins of the Foreclosure Rescue Scam and provided some characteristics to help homeowners recognize a scam from a safe distance. Even armed with good information, it’s sometimes hard to differentiate the good guys from the bad.

The scammer is well rehearsed at sounding smart, compassionate and sincere. At Keep Your Home California, we investigate these people fairly often and we seldom find conclusive evidence of their misdeeds. In this post, we will provide you with some practical steps that you can follow to review and identify these con artists. Warning: None of these techniques are foolproof and it’s very difficult to identify a scammer with any level of certainty.

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It is our hope that by doing a little research, you might uncover enough “red flags” to steer you away from potential danger before you lose any money. Here are a few simple steps that you can take to perform a high-level review:

  • Review correspondence from the potential Scammer. It’s likely that most of your contact with a scammer will be by email and telephone. The scammer typically doesn’t want to meet face-to-face. It’s unlikely they have an office and they might be located nowhere near you. Look at their email address. Is there a company or organization designation? Very often, scammers use public email services such as Hotmail, AOL or Gmail because they don’t work for a legitimate organization. A public email address is a red flag.

 

  • Ask about and verify licenses. Sometimes the scammer claims to be an attorney or claims to have a real estate license. They may tell you not to contact your lender, lawyer or credit counselor. Ask for their license or bar number and then verify the license with the State Bar of California or the California Bureau of Real Estate. Even without a number, you can search by name.
    • For an Attorney Search, go to http://members.calbar.ca.gov/fal/membersearch/quicksearch. Contact the attorney using the phone number listed in their profile, not the number given to you by the Scammer, to verify that the person listed is actually the person who contacted you.
    • To verify a Real Estate License, go to http://www2.dre.ca.gov/PublicASP/pplinfo.asp. Independently locate a phone number, using the internet or other genuine phone directories, and contact the person to verify that the person listed is actually the person who contacted you.

 

  • Evaluate their website … if they have one. The absence of a website is a major red flag. However, most scammers have a website. And, because they often have to change names to elude being caught, their websites are usually very sparse. A few pages without much real content and almost never the names, or photographs, of any employees, managers or executives. Their “Contact Us” page will usually be limited to an online contact form. No physical address, no phone numbers, no email addresses.

 

  • Check their physical address. If you do happen to have what appears to be a physical address, put it into Google Maps and see what appears. Go to the “Street View” if it is available. You might see an office building or a private residence but, more often than not, you will see a shopping center and one of the tenants in that shopping center will be a UPS Store, or similar mailbox service. Red flag!

 

  • Perform an Internet search. Use an effective search engine and look for the name of the company, of any individuals you can identify, and also search phone numbers that you have been given. If you poke around enough, you just might find useful information such as previous complaints.

 

  • Requests for fees. Any request for fees or money before any services are performed, payments in cash, money order or “wire transfers” are all warning signs.

Please remember that you might be dealing with criminals and we aren’t advocating that you become a private investigator or vigilante. Do not, in the course of your review, misrepresent yourself or violate anyone’s rights or privacy. If your research indicates that you are likely dealing with a Scammer, do not confront them, simply disengage.

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net.

 

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2 Comments on “Foreclosure crisis profiteers: Knowing the enemy”

  1. It looks like a real email, but somehow it got garbled.

  2. Tinoarango says:

    Can you tell me if this e mail is real.. Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone. From: Keep Your Home CaliforniaSent: Thursday, March 10, 2016 3:04 PMTo: tino.arango@yahoo.comReply To: Keep Your Home CaliforniaSubject: [New post] Foreclosure crisis profiteers: Knowing the enemy

    a:hover { color: red; } a { text-decoration: none; color: #0088cc; } a.primaryactionlink:link, a.primaryactionlink:visited { background-color: #2585B2; color: #fff; } a.primaryactionlink:hover, a.primaryactionlink:active { background-color: #11729E !important; color: #fff !important; }

    /* @media only screen and (max-device-width: 480px) { .post { min-width: 700px !important; } } */ WordPress.com

    keepyourhomeca posted: “Our previous two posts dealt with the origins of the Foreclosure Rescue Scam and provided some characteristics to help homeowners recognize a scam from a safe distance. Even armed with good information, it’s sometimes hard to differentiate the good guys f”


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